Your Reppler is at stake

13 10 2011

These days, hopefully we’re all at least a bit careful about what we put up on social networks. As a Civil Servant I tend to err on the side of caution, as the press like nothing better than to bash a public servant about something they posted inappropriately. Recently we had another Tweetgate scandal involving Chris Huhne, but such stories are nothing new. From Sarah Baskersville to Stuart MacLennan, the examples of what can happen when the media scent blood are out there for all to see.

I was also vaguely aware that potential employers might want to “vet” candidates online, but I’ve never given the matter much consideration. There is now a tool called Reppler that allows you to vet your own social media profile, and the results are an eye-opener. Here’s a snapshot of my attitude according to recent Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn posts.

My Reppler score

My Reppler score

It’s not too bad, apart from showcasing my obsessive cat tendencies, but I’m left wondering why I didn’t get 100% or why my attitude is only “partly positive”. Will employers see that as a natural thing or will they prefer candidates who are super-positive about everything? Will expressing an opinion on an issue of the day come back to bite me a few years down the line? Is it still safe to sign an e-petition?

I tend to use different social networks for different purposes and adapt my postings accordingly. Facebook is for fun – catching up with friends, arranging meets and posting  jokes. I’m still a bit careful about what I post on there, but it’s not exactly how I would like to present myself in the workplace either! I’ve already gone off it a bit with the latest revamp of the interface, but if its content is destined to be forever engraved on my resumé I might have to think about ditching it altogether. A recent survey showed that 91% of employers are now screening candidates on the web, so think twice before you post about your nights out next time – post something about how hard-working and enthusiastic you are instead.





Don’t panic!

2 08 2011

I’ve been asked to take part in a research project looking into how social media can be used in crisis comms. It’s an interesting subject and one I’m enjoying looking into. Our task is to find innovative and effective ways of sharing information – both privately between internal stakeholders and publicly to inform the general population.

Webmaster's guide to the internet

Webmaster's guide to the internet

To start off with, I’ve been having a look at the various platforms the group could use to share our initial findings. As I looked into the pros and cons of each, I quickly learned that there is no one ideal solution – the platform you choose will depend on your group’s specific needs and goals. I broke these considerations down into separate categories: 

  • Security – is the information safe from unauthorised access?
  • Flexibility – can the platform adapt to changing circumstances?
  • Ease of use – will all participants be comfortable using it?
  • Functionality – does the platform do everything we need it to?
  • Scalability – if the project grows arms and legs, will the platform be able to cope?
  • Reliability/stability of vendor – will the app still be available for the project lifecycle?
  • Affordability – does the pricing fit in with project budgets?

A wiki might be ideal for a fairly open discussion between tech-savvy users, but if privacy is more important and the participants aren’t that comfortable using the web, then something like Sharepoint might be more appropriate. Horses for courses, really.

I’m now trying to find some good examples of social media collaboration between UK government departments. This is harder than it looks, but I have come across several excellent articles in the process…

Have you come across any interesting collaborative projects recently? Anything else to say on the subject? Get your comments in…collaborate!





Double plus good

14 07 2011

The Interworld has a new challenger! For anyone ‘lucky’ enough to get an invite, Google+ allows you to participate in a stripped-down version of Facebook. The big thing on G+ is circles. Rather than having to painstakingly set individual privacy levels for all your friends on FB, G+ forces you to group people into Venn diagram-like sets, so that you can choose for each post whether this should be shared with ‘family’, ‘friends’, etc.

Facebook - the end of the love affair?

Facebook - the end of the love affair?

To be honest, this feels like a chore. Every time someone adds you, you have to add them back and decide which circle they belong to. Every time you share a post, you must define which circles to share it with. Why not just email the link and have done with it? Besides, the sharing functionality means that anyone a post is shared with can then send this on to their own circles, or even to an email address, so there’s no real security benefit there.

I haven’t yet set up my own circles, again this is because involves too much effort. Do I really have to decide which people should go into ‘ex-partners of friends’, ‘folk I work beside but have no real connection with’, ‘people I’d like to get invites from’, ‘guys who think I’ve accepted them but will never get any posts’, etc? This kind of goes against the whole ‘social’ movement on the web and feels a bit mean.

At the moment all G+ consists of is a limited selection of the people I see on Facebook anyway, but instead of shooting the breeze the majority of posts are about Google+ itself. What am I doing here? Ooh, I got plus-oned! I prefer Facebook. Anyone else like the circles thing?

As you might have gathered from previous posts, I’m not always good at judging the merits of new platforms! I’ll give Google the chance to finetune the interface and wait for registration to open up before I decide whether or not it’s for me. Facebook certainly has its problems, so at the very least this development might force Mark Zuckerberg and co to raise their game. Having said that, if G+ goes the same way as Google Buzz and Google Wave, I won’t be all that surprised.





Waze and means

20 06 2011

Channel 4 news alerted me to a new form of social media today. I must be losing my touch…anway, Waze looks like an intriguing prospect. It’s a bit like a live-updated Wikipedia for road networks, whereby drivers use GPS on their mobile devices to build up road networks and add traffic flow, accidents, speed traps and suchlike to the Waze maps as they go along.

Here’s a demo of how the platform works:

http://www.waze.com/guided_tour/international_tour.swf

As someone who works in the transport industry I look forward to the time when Waze has expanded to cover the Glasgow/Scotland area, as it could have a huge impact on how we report transport news and developments. Not to mention the travel time it could save me! Watch this space.





Social Governance

22 06 2010

A nice blog article by Dave Briggs in which he looks at how governmental departments have moved on from talking about social media to actually using it. We’ve still got much to achieve in this area though, as Dave and his contributors are only too aware. The nightmare of red tape, getting clearance and the worry over negative press coverage makes the vast majority of communication to stakeholders (i.e. the general public) so bland and uninteresting that it misses the point of social media entirely – it doesn’t engage.

Still it’s a start, and anything that gets the public even slightly more communicative with the powers that be (and vice-versa) has to be a good thing.